eidolon

Jul. 26th, 2009 12:57 am
baleanoptera: (fairytale snowwhite)
A slightly modified version of the image-meme seen floating around LJ lately. Apparently I cannot resist a meme that focuses on pictures.

1. Post ten of any pictures currently on your hard drive that you think are self-expressive.

2. NO CAPTIONS! It must be like we're speaking with images and we have to interpret your visual language just like we have to interpret your words.

3. They must ALREADY be on your hard drive - no googling or flickr! They have to have been saved to your folders sometime in the past. They must be something you've saved there because it resonated with you for some reason.


++++ )
In other news I am way behind on comments, and will start working on that in the next few days. Apparently those who said that summer was a time for holidays and relaxation lied.
baleanoptera: (WWII Lady marine)


I'm currently in love with these 1940's kodachrome photos by Jack Delano found at my beloved Shorpy photo archive. In particular I'm fascinated by his images of the railroads where his choice of angels, light and perspective turn the railroads into near abstract works of art. ++++ )
baleanoptera: (WWII Lady marine)


I'm currently in love with these 1940's kodachrome photos by Jack Delano found at my beloved Shorpy photo archive. In particular I'm fascinated by his images of the railroads where his choice of angels, light and perspective turn the railroads into near abstract works of art. ++++ )
baleanoptera: (BoB Lipton)
I find these images more than a bit eerie, and quite fascinating:

Old photos from the WWII siege of Leningrad photoshoped and blended in with modern day images of St. Petersburg.


++++++ )
All images from this site.
baleanoptera: (BoB Lipton)
I find these images more than a bit eerie, and quite fascinating:

Old photos from the WWII siege of Leningrad photoshoped and blended in with modern day images of St. Petersburg.


++++++ )
All images from this site.
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)
Now this is just cool. The US Library of Congress has uploaded hundreds of old tourist photos from Norway. Not only are they from around 1890 to 1900 but they are in photochrome! Please, allow me to geek out and be a nerd, but I love the strange colours of photochrome.



But the most fascinating thing is that the tourist images of the 1890's are more or less exactly the same as the tourist images of today. With a few of these images all that differs from the modern postcard are the strange colours and the odd font exclaiming: "Wish you were here!"

And of course there are more images behind the cut. the fjords are alive etc )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)
Now this is just cool. The US Library of Congress has uploaded hundreds of old tourist photos from Norway. Not only are they from around 1890 to 1900 but they are in photochrome! Please, allow me to geek out and be a nerd, but I love the strange colours of photochrome.



But the most fascinating thing is that the tourist images of the 1890's are more or less exactly the same as the tourist images of today. With a few of these images all that differs from the modern postcard are the strange colours and the odd font exclaiming: "Wish you were here!"

And of course there are more images behind the cut. the fjords are alive etc )
baleanoptera: (WWII Shorpy riveter yellow and blue)
In 1928 there was a huge fair in this city, and part of the attractions of this fair was a photograph stand. It was called Pictures while you wait, and was literary that. In its time it was cutting edge technology, and people flocked to have their photos taken – and took the images home with them.

Now the years pass, and the fair and its photos were more or less forgotten – until someone uncovered boxes upon boxes of the photo negatives. Suddenly, by developing the negatives, you could see all the different faces of the people visiting the fair. Young and old, rich and poor. There was one problem though, and that was that none of the negatives was marked or named. So the people in the photos were by and large unknown.

Lots of fascinating pictures! See them while you wait! )
baleanoptera: (WWII Shorpy riveter yellow and blue)
In 1928 there was a huge fair in this city, and part of the attractions of this fair was a photograph stand. It was called Pictures while you wait, and was literary that. In its time it was cutting edge technology, and people flocked to have their photos taken – and took the images home with them.

Now the years pass, and the fair and its photos were more or less forgotten – until someone uncovered boxes upon boxes of the photo negatives. Suddenly, by developing the negatives, you could see all the different faces of the people visiting the fair. Young and old, rich and poor. There was one problem though, and that was that none of the negatives was marked or named. So the people in the photos were by and large unknown.

Lots of fascinating pictures! See them while you wait! )
baleanoptera: (WWII Lady marine)


I've fallen a bit in love with a blog. It is called Shorpy - the 100 year old photo blog, though that title shouldn't be taken literary as they've recently posted a lot of kodachrome images from the Second World War. And such stunning images as well. The colours are nearly vibrant and translucent, and I find them particularly interesting when compared to the almost monochrome vision of World War II as seen in Letters from Iwo Jima or Saving Private Ryan.
click for rather large images )

It is pictures like these that makes you wonder why we continue to depict the Second World War as a bleak and shadowy place. Do we desaturate the colours of the films to fit the mood of the story? Or are we influenced by the grainy, black and white look of old documentaries? In other words are we so used to looking at blurry black and white films that this has become the staple for how the war should be depicted? So that a movie with vibrant colours would seem "off",even if it in reality would not be?

But do you know the really scary part? One of the films that most accurately depicts World War II as far as colours go is Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor. Troubling isn't it?

ETA: This is not a colour photo, but the composition is just too wonderful and surreal.
baleanoptera: (WWII Lady marine)


I've fallen a bit in love with a blog. It is called Shorpy - the 100 year old photo blog, though that title shouldn't be taken literary as they've recently posted a lot of kodachrome images from the Second World War. And such stunning images as well. The colours are nearly vibrant and translucent, and I find them particularly interesting when compared to the almost monochrome vision of World War II as seen in Letters from Iwo Jima or Saving Private Ryan.
click for rather large images )

It is pictures like these that makes you wonder why we continue to depict the Second World War as a bleak and shadowy place. Do we desaturate the colours of the films to fit the mood of the story? Or are we influenced by the grainy, black and white look of old documentaries? In other words are we so used to looking at blurry black and white films that this has become the staple for how the war should be depicted? So that a movie with vibrant colours would seem "off",even if it in reality would not be?

But do you know the really scary part? One of the films that most accurately depicts World War II as far as colours go is Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor. Troubling isn't it?

ETA: This is not a colour photo, but the composition is just too wonderful and surreal.
baleanoptera: (Mood Cat)



I knew my cats were missing something! Artist Jeff DeBoer makes Cat and Mice armour, inspired by different periods and styles. Takes the infamous cat&mice conflict to whole different level doesn't it?

Ye olde larger images )

Jeff DeBoer's gallery - with more armour! - can be found here.
baleanoptera: (Mood Cat)



I knew my cats were missing something! Artist Jeff DeBoer makes Cat and Mice armour, inspired by different periods and styles. Takes the infamous cat&mice conflict to whole different level doesn't it?

Ye olde larger images )

Jeff DeBoer's gallery - with more armour! - can be found here.
baleanoptera: (Default)


I don't think these photographs are new, but I don't really care. I've been staring at them for the better part of the last hour. Truth is I'm lost for words. It doesn't look so much like a Bengal Tiger diving for food, as some ancient beast or mythic creature!

Larger pics under the cut )

Photos by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
baleanoptera: (Default)


I don't think these photographs are new, but I don't really care. I've been staring at them for the better part of the last hour. Truth is I'm lost for words. It doesn't look so much like a Bengal Tiger diving for food, as some ancient beast or mythic creature!

Larger pics under the cut )

Photos by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
baleanoptera: (Default)
The city where I live in is doing a wonderful thing. It is taking all the old photographic archives and making them available on the net. All the old photos left to the city or somehow in the city's care is being made available - with names if possible.


Cut for quite a lot of pictures )
baleanoptera: (Default)
The city where I live in is doing a wonderful thing. It is taking all the old photographic archives and making them available on the net. All the old photos left to the city or somehow in the city's care is being made available - with names if possible.


Cut for quite a lot of pictures )

Most def!

Feb. 9th, 2007 08:11 pm
baleanoptera: (Wire Stringer bell in suit)
So I’ve spent the day at a seminar on photography. From this I’ve learned two things.

1.When they key note speaker looks like the twin brother of Nathaniel Parker – aka Inspector Lynley among other things – and has a wonderful, honey voice it is extremely easy to get distracted. When he starts talking about the sensuality and the intimacy of photography this doubles.

2.Art Historical titles on books or lectures are sometimes bordering on the pompous and the absurd. Today I’ve listened to "The Death of the Death of the Photograph", "The Arbitrary Stillness of Surrendering to the Image" (no, I have no idea what that was about. At one point she talked about "the sharp intake of breath as we watch images, as a sign that time passes" Okay then... And "Sepulchre – the image in a new media age".

Fortunately the day also saw the arrival of The Wire season 3! And I’ll just add some more exclamation marks here: !!!!!! to properly highlight the occasion.

So far I’m two episodes in. I’m possibly already loving Bunny Colvin – who has just given his "paper bag for drugs" speech – and Stringer Bell with his chair meetings is beyond words.
"The chair don’t recognise your ass!" Hee. And the bit about Cheese and his dawg was absolutely wonderful.

In conclusion- if you don’t hear from me the next few days it’s because I’m hugging my The Wire dvd – or I’m silently pondering the question if it’s sane to watch Rome and The Wire at the same time.

Most def!

Feb. 9th, 2007 08:11 pm
baleanoptera: (Wire Stringer bell in suit)
So I’ve spent the day at a seminar on photography. From this I’ve learned two things.

1.When they key note speaker looks like the twin brother of Nathaniel Parker – aka Inspector Lynley among other things – and has a wonderful, honey voice it is extremely easy to get distracted. When he starts talking about the sensuality and the intimacy of photography this doubles.

2.Art Historical titles on books or lectures are sometimes bordering on the pompous and the absurd. Today I’ve listened to "The Death of the Death of the Photograph", "The Arbitrary Stillness of Surrendering to the Image" (no, I have no idea what that was about. At one point she talked about "the sharp intake of breath as we watch images, as a sign that time passes" Okay then... And "Sepulchre – the image in a new media age".

Fortunately the day also saw the arrival of The Wire season 3! And I’ll just add some more exclamation marks here: !!!!!! to properly highlight the occasion.

So far I’m two episodes in. I’m possibly already loving Bunny Colvin – who has just given his "paper bag for drugs" speech – and Stringer Bell with his chair meetings is beyond words.
"The chair don’t recognise your ass!" Hee. And the bit about Cheese and his dawg was absolutely wonderful.

In conclusion- if you don’t hear from me the next few days it’s because I’m hugging my The Wire dvd – or I’m silently pondering the question if it’s sane to watch Rome and The Wire at the same time.
baleanoptera: (BoB Roe syringe)
Sometimes we forget how a thing looks. The precise details of an event or the faces of people we knew. Memory can be a fickle thing. But we are in luck, because we have things that can remind us, we have words, films and photographs that can show us how things were. Right?

cut for picture )

This picture was taken in Normandy on the 6. June, 1944, also known as D-Day. It was taken by Robert Capa who was known for saying that "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough." True to his own motto Capa joined the Allied landing as part of the first assault wave, armed not with a gun but a camera.
and another picture )

Sadly for Capa, but interestingly for posterity, Life magazine who had commissioned the pictures had a little dark room mishap, and thereby destroyed most of the film.
Of the over a hundred pictures Capa had taken, only 11 frames survived, and the photos developed a grainy, shaky feel. Life magazine printed them anyway and claimed the pictures where unclear and out of focus because Capa’s hand was shaking with excitement, and he therefore couldn’t focus properly.
and further pictures )

~~~~

A big thanks to [livejournal.com profile] semyaza who made the comment about how we could forget how things looked - and somehow that comment started all this.
And also to [livejournal.com profile] applegnat who had some very good points about Troy, as well as what happens to fiction when we try to turn it into fact. Cheers! :)

ETA: Somehow the introduction fell out. *facepalm* It's there now, and hopefully it makes more sense now.

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