baleanoptera: (BoB Roe Skulking)


Since it was on sale I splashed out and bought The Real History behind Foyle's War. It tells of the true stories that inspired the series, as well as being filled with glossy pictures both from the series and the real events.

Did you know that Sam was based on creator Anthony Horowitz'z governess Norah Fitzgerald, who was a WAAF driver during World War II? "Known to her superior officers as "Fitzy", she told Anthony about her marvelous life in uniform and all the fun she had driving important people in a motor car at a time when most girls like her were not expected to be going out working at all. There was also, however, almost inevitably, a sad side to her stories: she fell in love with a pilot and was devastated when he was killed during the Battle of Britain. Sam then, is Anthony's tribute to Fitzy, a feisty, intelligent, inquisitive young woman who relishes the prospect of making her mark in an unfamiliar world." (p. 65)

For some reason this makes me love Sam even more(if that is possible!).

Andrew Foyle and his RAF antics were based on the memoirs of two RAF pilots called Richard Hillary and Geoffrey Wellum, and especially Hillary's book The Last Enemy.
Hee - I love knowing things like that.

The stories themselves are also based on real events. The spy in Fifty Ships is based on a real spy Carl Meier, who came to England the 3. September 1940. he was caught because he walked into Lydd in Kent to buy some drinks and cigarettes. "With no knowledge of English licensing laws, his first port of call was a pub where he asked for some cider. The landlady explained that she could not serve him just yet and recommended that he take a look around the town. When he came back it would be time. When he came back the landlady had summoned help and Meier was taken to Lydd police station." (p. 95)

Terry Charman from the Imperial War Museum, London has been a consultant for the book. Charman's finds few faults with Foyle's war except this which rather amused me:

"The attention to detail that goes into 1940's costume is impressive", he says, "but no one who did not live in the 1940's really knows how to wear those clothes. Milner, for example, looks slightly awkward in a hat. In old movies like Waterloo Road , people knew how to wear hats, how to dress in 1940's clothes. You can the period detail right, but the actors will always look slightly out of place in the old clothes because, for example, gentlemen nowadays do not wear hats like that." (p. 57)

Poor Milner! ;D


Hmm...now I really want to watch Foyle's War again.
baleanoptera: (BoB Roe Skulking)


Since it was on sale I splashed out and bought The Real History behind Foyle's War. It tells of the true stories that inspired the series, as well as being filled with glossy pictures both from the series and the real events.

Did you know that Sam was based on creator Anthony Horowitz'z governess Norah Fitzgerald, who was a WAAF driver during World War II? "Known to her superior officers as "Fitzy", she told Anthony about her marvelous life in uniform and all the fun she had driving important people in a motor car at a time when most girls like her were not expected to be going out working at all. There was also, however, almost inevitably, a sad side to her stories: she fell in love with a pilot and was devastated when he was killed during the Battle of Britain. Sam then, is Anthony's tribute to Fitzy, a feisty, intelligent, inquisitive young woman who relishes the prospect of making her mark in an unfamiliar world." (p. 65)

For some reason this makes me love Sam even more(if that is possible!).

Andrew Foyle and his RAF antics were based on the memoirs of two RAF pilots called Richard Hillary and Geoffrey Wellum, and especially Hillary's book The Last Enemy.
Hee - I love knowing things like that.

The stories themselves are also based on real events. The spy in Fifty Ships is based on a real spy Carl Meier, who came to England the 3. September 1940. he was caught because he walked into Lydd in Kent to buy some drinks and cigarettes. "With no knowledge of English licensing laws, his first port of call was a pub where he asked for some cider. The landlady explained that she could not serve him just yet and recommended that he take a look around the town. When he came back it would be time. When he came back the landlady had summoned help and Meier was taken to Lydd police station." (p. 95)

Terry Charman from the Imperial War Museum, London has been a consultant for the book. Charman's finds few faults with Foyle's war except this which rather amused me:

"The attention to detail that goes into 1940's costume is impressive", he says, "but no one who did not live in the 1940's really knows how to wear those clothes. Milner, for example, looks slightly awkward in a hat. In old movies like Waterloo Road , people knew how to wear hats, how to dress in 1940's clothes. You can the period detail right, but the actors will always look slightly out of place in the old clothes because, for example, gentlemen nowadays do not wear hats like that." (p. 57)

Poor Milner! ;D


Hmm...now I really want to watch Foyle's War again.
baleanoptera: (BoB Roe syringe)
Sometimes we forget how a thing looks. The precise details of an event or the faces of people we knew. Memory can be a fickle thing. But we are in luck, because we have things that can remind us, we have words, films and photographs that can show us how things were. Right?

cut for picture )

This picture was taken in Normandy on the 6. June, 1944, also known as D-Day. It was taken by Robert Capa who was known for saying that "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough." True to his own motto Capa joined the Allied landing as part of the first assault wave, armed not with a gun but a camera.
and another picture )

Sadly for Capa, but interestingly for posterity, Life magazine who had commissioned the pictures had a little dark room mishap, and thereby destroyed most of the film.
Of the over a hundred pictures Capa had taken, only 11 frames survived, and the photos developed a grainy, shaky feel. Life magazine printed them anyway and claimed the pictures where unclear and out of focus because Capa’s hand was shaking with excitement, and he therefore couldn’t focus properly.
and further pictures )

~~~~

A big thanks to [livejournal.com profile] semyaza who made the comment about how we could forget how things looked - and somehow that comment started all this.
And also to [livejournal.com profile] applegnat who had some very good points about Troy, as well as what happens to fiction when we try to turn it into fact. Cheers! :)

ETA: Somehow the introduction fell out. *facepalm* It's there now, and hopefully it makes more sense now.
baleanoptera: (BoB Roe syringe)
Sometimes we forget how a thing looks. The precise details of an event or the faces of people we knew. Memory can be a fickle thing. But we are in luck, because we have things that can remind us, we have words, films and photographs that can show us how things were. Right?

cut for picture )

This picture was taken in Normandy on the 6. June, 1944, also known as D-Day. It was taken by Robert Capa who was known for saying that "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough." True to his own motto Capa joined the Allied landing as part of the first assault wave, armed not with a gun but a camera.
and another picture )

Sadly for Capa, but interestingly for posterity, Life magazine who had commissioned the pictures had a little dark room mishap, and thereby destroyed most of the film.
Of the over a hundred pictures Capa had taken, only 11 frames survived, and the photos developed a grainy, shaky feel. Life magazine printed them anyway and claimed the pictures where unclear and out of focus because Capa’s hand was shaking with excitement, and he therefore couldn’t focus properly.
and further pictures )

~~~~

A big thanks to [livejournal.com profile] semyaza who made the comment about how we could forget how things looked - and somehow that comment started all this.
And also to [livejournal.com profile] applegnat who had some very good points about Troy, as well as what happens to fiction when we try to turn it into fact. Cheers! :)

ETA: Somehow the introduction fell out. *facepalm* It's there now, and hopefully it makes more sense now.

Profile

baleanoptera: (Default)
baleanoptera

November 2015

S M T W T F S
1 234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jun. 23rd, 2017 01:52 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios