baleanoptera: (Goonies)
I've tried to resist, but I cannot help it. I just love movie quotes too much. And though I wouldn't call all these movies my favourites, they are all films I've seen more than twice.

Pick 10 of your favorite movies.
Go to IMDb and find a quote from each movie.
Post them here for everyone to guess.
Strike it out when someone guesses correctly, and put who guessed it and the movie.
NO GOOGLING/using IMDb search functions.



1. A: There is a war on. How is it you are headed west?
B: Well, we kinda face to the north and real subtle-like turn left.
Last of the Mohicans, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] bzoppa and [livejournal.com profile] lage_nom_ai

the other nine )
baleanoptera: (Goonies)
I've tried to resist, but I cannot help it. I just love movie quotes too much. And though I wouldn't call all these movies my favourites, they are all films I've seen more than twice.

Pick 10 of your favorite movies.
Go to IMDb and find a quote from each movie.
Post them here for everyone to guess.
Strike it out when someone guesses correctly, and put who guessed it and the movie.
NO GOOGLING/using IMDb search functions.



1. A: There is a war on. How is it you are headed west?
B: Well, we kinda face to the north and real subtle-like turn left.
Last of the Mohicans, guessed by [livejournal.com profile] bzoppa and [livejournal.com profile] lage_nom_ai

the other nine )
baleanoptera: (Sparta 300 white and swirly)
It really started with something [livejournal.com profile] nutmeg3 said, about movies you've seen countless times - and that still manage to get to you and give you goosebumps. Possibly they contain that undefinable "it" factor; impossible to pinpoint, highly reliant on personal preference and generally goosebumps inducing.

So I though - what are the movies that always gets to me - even if I know them down to the smallest camera angle? Well, this is a select list and in no particular order.

Fellowship of the Ring

I love all the LOTR movies, but this is the one that gets to me. Why? It's Boromir dying. It really is. It's the manner of the death - the story surrounding it, and the way he is shot by those hellish arrows and sinks to his knees.

But it is also the light and sound involved. The way the sound is dimmed, and everything becomes eerie and quiet. The sound and the drama of the movie fades in parallel with Boromir dying, and the beautiful dramatic soundscape that is LOTR pauses a little. The effect is a little of the world coming to a halt as Boromir dies, and that always gives me goosebumps.

Sometimes it also makes me sniffle and cry.

The Last of the Mohicans

Um...more endings and death actually. It's the the end on the promontory, with Uncas running up the mountainside towards his fatal fight with Magua. It's Alice jumping after him - and this crushing, horrible climax set in absolutely stunning surroundings.

The promontory scene works for me not only because it's beautiful and dramatic, but because it uncovers this whole undercurrent of a storyline (Uncas and Alice)that has been running through the movie. And not only does it uncover it - but in many ways lets it take center stage and leaving Hawkeye as a bistander.(Which is fine by me, as I could give a great big yawn in regards to the Hawkeye and Cora plot.)

And through all of this there is almost no dialouge - just music. Music heavy with drums and rhythm, almost like a heartbeat. I love that.

The Lion in Winter
- the Katharin Hepburn and Peter O'Toole version

It's a little difficult to specify a scene here as this is possibly one of my favorite movies of all time. But one scene that always gets to me is when Eleanore is trying to win back her son Richard's favor. She is cooing and cursing almost at the same time, playing upon childhood memories and buried affection.

She tells Richard she'll write a will, giving all her lands to him. "Paper burns", Richard replies. "I'll scratch your name in this!" she says and slices into her hand and this finally breaks him, and he runs to her. As he stands there kissing her bleeding hand she starts to talk about how good things where when it was just them, and how good things will be.

And I'm never sure how much of what Eleanore says is an act, how much in genuine and how much is a mix of both. I sometimes wonder if even she knows. It's a brilliant performance in a brilliant film - and it gives me goosebumps each and every time.

East of Eden

I love this film to bits - most easily shown by the fact that I prefer to watch it in silence.
(I can talk while watching a film or series, but if I truly adore and love it there must be silence. Absolute silence. Headphones are good.;D)

Once again it's the ending that never fails to get to me. After hours of misunderstandings, miscommunication, biblical parallels and symbolism Cal finally manages to connect to his father. The clinch is of course that his father is sick and dying, and that Cal's brother has gone a little crazy - so things are in general not good. And yet, as Cal sits there and reads to his father there is a little glimpse of hope - and this is where the goosebumps come.
With the hope.



If any of you have any goosebumps inducing films I'd love to hear about them.
baleanoptera: (Sparta 300 white and swirly)
It really started with something [livejournal.com profile] nutmeg3 said, about movies you've seen countless times - and that still manage to get to you and give you goosebumps. Possibly they contain that undefinable "it" factor; impossible to pinpoint, highly reliant on personal preference and generally goosebumps inducing.

So I though - what are the movies that always gets to me - even if I know them down to the smallest camera angle? Well, this is a select list and in no particular order.

Fellowship of the Ring

I love all the LOTR movies, but this is the one that gets to me. Why? It's Boromir dying. It really is. It's the manner of the death - the story surrounding it, and the way he is shot by those hellish arrows and sinks to his knees.

But it is also the light and sound involved. The way the sound is dimmed, and everything becomes eerie and quiet. The sound and the drama of the movie fades in parallel with Boromir dying, and the beautiful dramatic soundscape that is LOTR pauses a little. The effect is a little of the world coming to a halt as Boromir dies, and that always gives me goosebumps.

Sometimes it also makes me sniffle and cry.

The Last of the Mohicans

Um...more endings and death actually. It's the the end on the promontory, with Uncas running up the mountainside towards his fatal fight with Magua. It's Alice jumping after him - and this crushing, horrible climax set in absolutely stunning surroundings.

The promontory scene works for me not only because it's beautiful and dramatic, but because it uncovers this whole undercurrent of a storyline (Uncas and Alice)that has been running through the movie. And not only does it uncover it - but in many ways lets it take center stage and leaving Hawkeye as a bistander.(Which is fine by me, as I could give a great big yawn in regards to the Hawkeye and Cora plot.)

And through all of this there is almost no dialouge - just music. Music heavy with drums and rhythm, almost like a heartbeat. I love that.

The Lion in Winter
- the Katharin Hepburn and Peter O'Toole version

It's a little difficult to specify a scene here as this is possibly one of my favorite movies of all time. But one scene that always gets to me is when Eleanore is trying to win back her son Richard's favor. She is cooing and cursing almost at the same time, playing upon childhood memories and buried affection.

She tells Richard she'll write a will, giving all her lands to him. "Paper burns", Richard replies. "I'll scratch your name in this!" she says and slices into her hand and this finally breaks him, and he runs to her. As he stands there kissing her bleeding hand she starts to talk about how good things where when it was just them, and how good things will be.

And I'm never sure how much of what Eleanore says is an act, how much in genuine and how much is a mix of both. I sometimes wonder if even she knows. It's a brilliant performance in a brilliant film - and it gives me goosebumps each and every time.

East of Eden

I love this film to bits - most easily shown by the fact that I prefer to watch it in silence.
(I can talk while watching a film or series, but if I truly adore and love it there must be silence. Absolute silence. Headphones are good.;D)

Once again it's the ending that never fails to get to me. After hours of misunderstandings, miscommunication, biblical parallels and symbolism Cal finally manages to connect to his father. The clinch is of course that his father is sick and dying, and that Cal's brother has gone a little crazy - so things are in general not good. And yet, as Cal sits there and reads to his father there is a little glimpse of hope - and this is where the goosebumps come.
With the hope.



If any of you have any goosebumps inducing films I'd love to hear about them.
baleanoptera: (Sean Bean anna karenina)
See a few days ago I watched Good night and Good Luck. Better later than never I suppose – for it was slightly brilliant. I loved the black and white feel, and how they had integrated it with actual footage. It gave the picture a documentary feel, which was backed up by the films near refusal to delve into the characters personal background. Also David Strathairn was close to mesmerising.

And I thought – wow, George Clooney in black and white looks like one of those old movies stars – they should cast him in a film noir flick. Well – apparently they did; for lo and behold the next day I saw the trailer to The Good German. I have never heard of it before a few days ago, but it looks so noir in all its black and white glory, and it stars George Clooney and Cate Blanchett, it’s directed by Steven Sodebergh and its set in post-war Berlin. So now I’m intrigued. And according to IMDb Robin Weigert has a small role. If it’s possible to love a film solely on who is slated to play in it, then I’m half way there.


The trailer for the new James Bond has started showing, and on my way to work I’m each morning greeted by a huge picture of Daniel Craig. And yes, it is a very nice way to start the day. He looks like he could make a good Bond, and better than Pierce Brosnan who too much "La! I’m James Bond – I might kill people, but I prefer to play golf" for me to like him. I’m very particular about James Bond. Watching the movies were my father’s choice of father-daughter activity, along side going to "The National War and military museum". These two things might have affected me. But surely I'm not the only one with clear prefrences in the James Bond apartment?

That said I suspect part of my brain will always identify Daniel Craig as the murder-monk from Elizabeth. *g*

But further joy! Mads Mikkelsen is playing the bad guy. He was last seen with facial tattoos and a hawk in King Arthur (aka the movie I know is a little bad, but kind of love any way). Apparently Mikkelsen was a professional dancer for 8 years, and is a painter on the side. First Viggo Mortensen, and now him – what is it with these multi-talented actors from Denmark?
baleanoptera: (Sean Bean anna karenina)
See a few days ago I watched Good night and Good Luck. Better later than never I suppose – for it was slightly brilliant. I loved the black and white feel, and how they had integrated it with actual footage. It gave the picture a documentary feel, which was backed up by the films near refusal to delve into the characters personal background. Also David Strathairn was close to mesmerising.

And I thought – wow, George Clooney in black and white looks like one of those old movies stars – they should cast him in a film noir flick. Well – apparently they did; for lo and behold the next day I saw the trailer to The Good German. I have never heard of it before a few days ago, but it looks so noir in all its black and white glory, and it stars George Clooney and Cate Blanchett, it’s directed by Steven Sodebergh and its set in post-war Berlin. So now I’m intrigued. And according to IMDb Robin Weigert has a small role. If it’s possible to love a film solely on who is slated to play in it, then I’m half way there.


The trailer for the new James Bond has started showing, and on my way to work I’m each morning greeted by a huge picture of Daniel Craig. And yes, it is a very nice way to start the day. He looks like he could make a good Bond, and better than Pierce Brosnan who too much "La! I’m James Bond – I might kill people, but I prefer to play golf" for me to like him. I’m very particular about James Bond. Watching the movies were my father’s choice of father-daughter activity, along side going to "The National War and military museum". These two things might have affected me. But surely I'm not the only one with clear prefrences in the James Bond apartment?

That said I suspect part of my brain will always identify Daniel Craig as the murder-monk from Elizabeth. *g*

But further joy! Mads Mikkelsen is playing the bad guy. He was last seen with facial tattoos and a hawk in King Arthur (aka the movie I know is a little bad, but kind of love any way). Apparently Mikkelsen was a professional dancer for 8 years, and is a painter on the side. First Viggo Mortensen, and now him – what is it with these multi-talented actors from Denmark?

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