baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)


The Sagas tells it like this: The Queen Ragnhild had great dreams, she was a wise woman. Once she dreamt that she was in her garden, and pulled a thorn from her dress. The thorn fell to the ground and a tree started sprouting. At the roots the tree was blood red, the trunk and lower branches were green, but the upper branches were white. The tree was so great and large that it seemed to the Queen it stretched out over all over Norway.

That story appears in Halvdan the Black's Saga, one of the first sagas in Heimskringla, or kringla heimsins meaning the circle of the world. It was written by Snorri Sturlason around 1230 and is a compilation of the Old Norse Kings' Sagas.

During the peak of the Norwegian independence movement, from around 1890 to cessation from Sweden in 1905 - these old sagas became a focal point in the emerging national sentiment. As a result of that a special edition of the saga was published - lavishly illustrated by the who's who of Norwegian artists at the time.

+++++ )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)


The Sagas tells it like this: The Queen Ragnhild had great dreams, she was a wise woman. Once she dreamt that she was in her garden, and pulled a thorn from her dress. The thorn fell to the ground and a tree started sprouting. At the roots the tree was blood red, the trunk and lower branches were green, but the upper branches were white. The tree was so great and large that it seemed to the Queen it stretched out over all over Norway.

That story appears in Halvdan the Black's Saga, one of the first sagas in Heimskringla, or kringla heimsins meaning the circle of the world. It was written by Snorri Sturlason around 1230 and is a compilation of the Old Norse Kings' Sagas.

During the peak of the Norwegian independence movement, from around 1890 to cessation from Sweden in 1905 - these old sagas became a focal point in the emerging national sentiment. As a result of that a special edition of the saga was published - lavishly illustrated by the who's who of Norwegian artists at the time.

+++++ )
baleanoptera: (church light Art: Andrey)


Now this is utterly fascinating. The artist Jason de Caires Taylor has made several sculptures and instalments intended to be seen while diving.
Circle )

I think this circle of statues is my favourite. There is something mysterious and almost fairytale like about it. The artists says he wants his art to highlight ecology, as well as the relationship between the modern world and the environment. For more pictures check out his web site here, where is also where I got the pictures from.
baleanoptera: (church light Art: Andrey)


Now this is utterly fascinating. The artist Jason de Caires Taylor has made several sculptures and instalments intended to be seen while diving.
Circle )

I think this circle of statues is my favourite. There is something mysterious and almost fairytale like about it. The artists says he wants his art to highlight ecology, as well as the relationship between the modern world and the environment. For more pictures check out his web site here, where is also where I got the pictures from.
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)

the roof of Hopperstad Stave Church


The first two things you will notice about stave churches are that they are not very big, and secondly that they smell of tar. The tar smell is distinctive, almost all encompassing. And it changes with the seasons.

In winter the smell will be soft and blended with the clear scent of cold. In summer it will be heavy and heady. Sometime you visit a church that has been newly tarred, and then you can almost smell the building before you see it. The boards and the pillars will have a glistening, dark coat and they will be sticky to touch.

I guess the reason I mention tar is that, in a way, its smell is a constant reminder that these are buildings constructed from what was living matter. These buildings are made of wood.
lots of churches )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)

the roof of Hopperstad Stave Church


The first two things you will notice about stave churches are that they are not very big, and secondly that they smell of tar. The tar smell is distinctive, almost all encompassing. And it changes with the seasons.

In winter the smell will be soft and blended with the clear scent of cold. In summer it will be heavy and heady. Sometime you visit a church that has been newly tarred, and then you can almost smell the building before you see it. The boards and the pillars will have a glistening, dark coat and they will be sticky to touch.

I guess the reason I mention tar is that, in a way, its smell is a constant reminder that these are buildings constructed from what was living matter. These buildings are made of wood.
lots of churches )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)

A carved dragons head found in the Oseberg burial


I'm currently reading a very interesting book called The Idea of North, which deals with all manner of folklore and legends in the Polar region. One passage reminded me why I LOVE the old Norse Sagas:


"The verse narrative of The Waking of Angatyr, interprolated in the Saga of King Heindrik the Wise, takes place on a burning offshore island which is simultaneously the place where the noble dead are buried and an otherworld to which the living can travel at their peril. Hervor travels there to demand of her father Angantyr the supernatural sword that has been buried with him. As with almost all ghost narratives of the north, the early waning of the winter daylight is crucial. In the zone between the living and the dead in which the poem opens, there is a terse dialogue between the heroine and a herdsman, on the dangers of being benighted in such a place:

To have come hither, all alone
To this land of shadows was sheer folly,
Over fen and fold fires are soaring,
Graves are opening: let us go quickly.


But she is fearless: she curses and threatens the waking dead until they yield to her the sword that has been buried as part of Angantyr’s grave goods, but not without the prophecy from its dead owner that it will "Destroy your kindred, kill them all" To which she replies:
Churlish cowards! )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)

A carved dragons head found in the Oseberg burial


I'm currently reading a very interesting book called The Idea of North, which deals with all manner of folklore and legends in the Polar region. One passage reminded me why I LOVE the old Norse Sagas:


"The verse narrative of The Waking of Angatyr, interprolated in the Saga of King Heindrik the Wise, takes place on a burning offshore island which is simultaneously the place where the noble dead are buried and an otherworld to which the living can travel at their peril. Hervor travels there to demand of her father Angantyr the supernatural sword that has been buried with him. As with almost all ghost narratives of the north, the early waning of the winter daylight is crucial. In the zone between the living and the dead in which the poem opens, there is a terse dialogue between the heroine and a herdsman, on the dangers of being benighted in such a place:

To have come hither, all alone
To this land of shadows was sheer folly,
Over fen and fold fires are soaring,
Graves are opening: let us go quickly.


But she is fearless: she curses and threatens the waking dead until they yield to her the sword that has been buried as part of Angantyr’s grave goods, but not without the prophecy from its dead owner that it will "Destroy your kindred, kill them all" To which she replies:
Churlish cowards! )
baleanoptera: (Historical Cassiopeia)


A few years ago I went to Mont St. Michel in Normandy. It was a cold, windy February day – every now and then it would rain – but that didn’t stop me falling in love with the place.

There’s this oddity to why I like certain works of art that has nothing what so ever to do with the art works aesthetical qualities. For objectively I can look at a painting or a statue and see why it’s good or even famous. But this is not the same as liking it.

Liking implies something else. It’s that feeling you cannot pinpoint and that is best articulated with a near breathless "wow". I guess, in a way, it can be compared to having a crush on someone. One of those "love at first sight" crushes that makes you giggle a bit, and ignore any possible flaws. And those crushes, for me at least, are always connected to first impressions. So the first view of the art work, the feel and mood when I see it becomes highly important. ++++++++ )
So good people – have you had an emotional experience that forever colour and affect the way you view something? A work of art? A book? A film?

And to prove that I am indeed very much in love with Mont St. Michel here is a link to a previous post with some stunning photos.
baleanoptera: (Historical Cassiopeia)


A few years ago I went to Mont St. Michel in Normandy. It was a cold, windy February day – every now and then it would rain – but that didn’t stop me falling in love with the place.

There’s this oddity to why I like certain works of art that has nothing what so ever to do with the art works aesthetical qualities. For objectively I can look at a painting or a statue and see why it’s good or even famous. But this is not the same as liking it.

Liking implies something else. It’s that feeling you cannot pinpoint and that is best articulated with a near breathless "wow". I guess, in a way, it can be compared to having a crush on someone. One of those "love at first sight" crushes that makes you giggle a bit, and ignore any possible flaws. And those crushes, for me at least, are always connected to first impressions. So the first view of the art work, the feel and mood when I see it becomes highly important. ++++++++ )
So good people – have you had an emotional experience that forever colour and affect the way you view something? A work of art? A book? A film?

And to prove that I am indeed very much in love with Mont St. Michel here is a link to a previous post with some stunning photos.
baleanoptera: (The Wire Omar)
Hmm..not much posting lately - but I'm currently trying to finish a paper and watching season 4 of The Wire.

I'm on episode six now and I must say that this season might become my new favourite, right next to season two. cut for s4 spoilers )

-----------


And then for something entirely different:

taken from [livejournal.com profile] appplegnat and [livejournal.com profile] finnygan - The ten things a reader of this LJ should know about me. Possibly...
spoilers for me? )


---------------------


And some links for last:

[livejournal.com profile] schionutlander has a fascinating post on the art of Otl Aicher. It is based on the life and theories of the medieval philosopher Wilhelm von Ockham, and is a modern interpretation of medieval art. Very interesting!

[livejournal.com profile] mr_kit has made some nice and creepy icons of Kittelsen's Old Mother Plague illustrations. (which I wrote about here)The icons capture the mood and the composition of the illustrations, all while being clear and a bit frightening. Highly recommended.
baleanoptera: (The Wire Omar)
Hmm..not much posting lately - but I'm currently trying to finish a paper and watching season 4 of The Wire.

I'm on episode six now and I must say that this season might become my new favourite, right next to season two. cut for s4 spoilers )

-----------


And then for something entirely different:

taken from [livejournal.com profile] appplegnat and [livejournal.com profile] finnygan - The ten things a reader of this LJ should know about me. Possibly...
spoilers for me? )


---------------------


And some links for last:

[livejournal.com profile] schionutlander has a fascinating post on the art of Otl Aicher. It is based on the life and theories of the medieval philosopher Wilhelm von Ockham, and is a modern interpretation of medieval art. Very interesting!

[livejournal.com profile] mr_kit has made some nice and creepy icons of Kittelsen's Old Mother Plague illustrations. (which I wrote about here)The icons capture the mood and the composition of the illustrations, all while being clear and a bit frightening. Highly recommended.
baleanoptera: (SW Padme concept dark)
So yesterday it was all about Romanticism and savage nature - therefore I found it fitting to turn to post-modernism and a very clear urban setting.



I have a bit of a thing for Street Art, and a rather large crush on the images of the artist Banksy.
click here for a rather large number of images )
baleanoptera: (SW Padme concept dark)
So yesterday it was all about Romanticism and savage nature - therefore I found it fitting to turn to post-modernism and a very clear urban setting.



I have a bit of a thing for Street Art, and a rather large crush on the images of the artist Banksy.
click here for a rather large number of images )
baleanoptera: (Norge atlanterhavsveien)
This all started after a comment by [livejournal.com profile] schionatulander about how European Art is usually seen just as Italian, French, German and British art - with a few artists from other European countries thrown in for good measure. It's sad that this is the norm, as it all helps create a very narrow (and IMO very boring)Art Historical canon.

Now Norway has one shining star on the Art Historical map and that is Edvard Munch. This is not a post about him. He has plenty of attention already.(and secretly I'm not that fond of Munch, and I make it a habit not to write too much about art I don't like. Which is also the reason why you will never find large ramblings about Rubens and Van Gogh in this journal.)
Instead this is a post about a Norwegian painter I'm very fond of: Peder Balke. And if you are now saying "Who?" then please read on.



more stormy weather under here )
baleanoptera: (Norge atlanterhavsveien)
This all started after a comment by [livejournal.com profile] schionatulander about how European Art is usually seen just as Italian, French, German and British art - with a few artists from other European countries thrown in for good measure. It's sad that this is the norm, as it all helps create a very narrow (and IMO very boring)Art Historical canon.

Now Norway has one shining star on the Art Historical map and that is Edvard Munch. This is not a post about him. He has plenty of attention already.(and secretly I'm not that fond of Munch, and I make it a habit not to write too much about art I don't like. Which is also the reason why you will never find large ramblings about Rubens and Van Gogh in this journal.)
Instead this is a post about a Norwegian painter I'm very fond of: Peder Balke. And if you are now saying "Who?" then please read on.



more stormy weather under here )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)
Well, it’s now official. I will be taking media studies this autumn, and in the spring I’ll hand in my master thesis in media studies. The fact that I already have a master in Art History points to the fact that I’m possibly a bit insane. (I’ve been through this shitstorm once – and now I’m doing it again? But I get to write about war films and Band of Brothers)
At any rate – both to keep me grounded and to hold on to whatever sanity I have left – I thought I’d post a bit about my favourite art objects.

(and if you are reading this Nol then know this is all you fault! The art posting I mean. Not the crazyness of doing media studies. Your question about my favourite art period got me thinking, and thinking, and thinking. Still no answer – but there is this:)

-----------------------------




Detail of Urnes Portal

The Portal of Urnes Stave Church



Portals and thresholds are dangerous places in all older, North European churches. They mark the division between the sacred inside and the profane outside –and thereby obtain a symbolic as well as practical function. The result is that most portals are lavishly decorated, often with saints and angels like the portals at Chartres or Vézelay.
text portal? )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)
Well, it’s now official. I will be taking media studies this autumn, and in the spring I’ll hand in my master thesis in media studies. The fact that I already have a master in Art History points to the fact that I’m possibly a bit insane. (I’ve been through this shitstorm once – and now I’m doing it again? But I get to write about war films and Band of Brothers)
At any rate – both to keep me grounded and to hold on to whatever sanity I have left – I thought I’d post a bit about my favourite art objects.

(and if you are reading this Nol then know this is all you fault! The art posting I mean. Not the crazyness of doing media studies. Your question about my favourite art period got me thinking, and thinking, and thinking. Still no answer – but there is this:)

-----------------------------




Detail of Urnes Portal

The Portal of Urnes Stave Church



Portals and thresholds are dangerous places in all older, North European churches. They mark the division between the sacred inside and the profane outside –and thereby obtain a symbolic as well as practical function. The result is that most portals are lavishly decorated, often with saints and angels like the portals at Chartres or Vézelay.
text portal? )
baleanoptera: (Mood Cat)



I knew my cats were missing something! Artist Jeff DeBoer makes Cat and Mice armour, inspired by different periods and styles. Takes the infamous cat&mice conflict to whole different level doesn't it?

Ye olde larger images )

Jeff DeBoer's gallery - with more armour! - can be found here.
baleanoptera: (Mood Cat)



I knew my cats were missing something! Artist Jeff DeBoer makes Cat and Mice armour, inspired by different periods and styles. Takes the infamous cat&mice conflict to whole different level doesn't it?

Ye olde larger images )

Jeff DeBoer's gallery - with more armour! - can be found here.

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