baleanoptera: (Film Buster Keaton Sherlock Jr)


There is something deliciously creepy and perfectly apt abut this poster. In fact it makes me want to see the film in a way the original poster ever did. At any rate: Retro-looking movie posters from Seek&Speak
more images behind cut )
baleanoptera: (Historical Buzzing sensation)
larger version behind cut )

Found on the great site World Digital Library. The images might load slow, but that's simply because they are of Tif quality. I have just spent the better part of this Sunday browsing at all the old maps, posters and photos here.

eidolon

Jul. 26th, 2009 12:57 am
baleanoptera: (fairytale snowwhite)
A slightly modified version of the image-meme seen floating around LJ lately. Apparently I cannot resist a meme that focuses on pictures.

1. Post ten of any pictures currently on your hard drive that you think are self-expressive.

2. NO CAPTIONS! It must be like we're speaking with images and we have to interpret your visual language just like we have to interpret your words.

3. They must ALREADY be on your hard drive - no googling or flickr! They have to have been saved to your folders sometime in the past. They must be something you've saved there because it resonated with you for some reason.


++++ )
In other news I am way behind on comments, and will start working on that in the next few days. Apparently those who said that summer was a time for holidays and relaxation lied.
baleanoptera: (WWII Lady marine)


A vintage WPA Federal Art Project poster from New York about tuberculosis. From 1941.

And I thought the swine flu scare was bad.

larger image under cut )

from Vintagraph
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)


The Sagas tells it like this: The Queen Ragnhild had great dreams, she was a wise woman. Once she dreamt that she was in her garden, and pulled a thorn from her dress. The thorn fell to the ground and a tree started sprouting. At the roots the tree was blood red, the trunk and lower branches were green, but the upper branches were white. The tree was so great and large that it seemed to the Queen it stretched out over all over Norway.

That story appears in Halvdan the Black's Saga, one of the first sagas in Heimskringla, or kringla heimsins meaning the circle of the world. It was written by Snorri Sturlason around 1230 and is a compilation of the Old Norse Kings' Sagas.

During the peak of the Norwegian independence movement, from around 1890 to cessation from Sweden in 1905 - these old sagas became a focal point in the emerging national sentiment. As a result of that a special edition of the saga was published - lavishly illustrated by the who's who of Norwegian artists at the time.

+++++ )
baleanoptera: (Norge Stavechurch)


The Sagas tells it like this: The Queen Ragnhild had great dreams, she was a wise woman. Once she dreamt that she was in her garden, and pulled a thorn from her dress. The thorn fell to the ground and a tree started sprouting. At the roots the tree was blood red, the trunk and lower branches were green, but the upper branches were white. The tree was so great and large that it seemed to the Queen it stretched out over all over Norway.

That story appears in Halvdan the Black's Saga, one of the first sagas in Heimskringla, or kringla heimsins meaning the circle of the world. It was written by Snorri Sturlason around 1230 and is a compilation of the Old Norse Kings' Sagas.

During the peak of the Norwegian independence movement, from around 1890 to cessation from Sweden in 1905 - these old sagas became a focal point in the emerging national sentiment. As a result of that a special edition of the saga was published - lavishly illustrated by the who's who of Norwegian artists at the time.

+++++ )
baleanoptera: (Default)

There is something so stylish and glamorous about 1930's and 1940's posters that even something like syphilis ends up with and aura of, well, style.

Milk, goggles and syphilis behind the cut )
baleanoptera: (Default)

There is something so stylish and glamorous about 1930's and 1940's posters that even something like syphilis ends up with and aura of, well, style.

Milk, goggles and syphilis behind the cut )
baleanoptera: (Default)
I have done a post about some of these images before, but the whole Death-theme over at [livejournal.com profile] told_tales gave it new relevance. So I've added lots more images, and some text which ended up expanding the post quite a bit.

------




In Norway there are many legends and stories about the Black Death. They all usually start with: "The Black Death came to Norway in 1348, and when it left there was hardly a person alive"

My favourite story was the one later illustrated by Theodore Kittelsen, and it goes something like this; During the Black Death the plague took the shape of an old woman, who hobbled from village to village, farm to farm. She’d be in old, raggedy clothes and carried a rake and a broom. If you saw her use the rake that meant that some of the people in the area would die. If she used the broom then everyone, yourself included, would be swept away.

The Black Death )
baleanoptera: (Default)
I have done a post about some of these images before, but the whole Death-theme over at [livejournal.com profile] told_tales gave it new relevance. So I've added lots more images, and some text which ended up expanding the post quite a bit.

------




In Norway there are many legends and stories about the Black Death. They all usually start with: "The Black Death came to Norway in 1348, and when it left there was hardly a person alive"

My favourite story was the one later illustrated by Theodore Kittelsen, and it goes something like this; During the Black Death the plague took the shape of an old woman, who hobbled from village to village, farm to farm. She’d be in old, raggedy clothes and carried a rake and a broom. If you saw her use the rake that meant that some of the people in the area would die. If she used the broom then everyone, yourself included, would be swept away.

The Black Death )
baleanoptera: (Default)
The excellent community [livejournal.com profile] told_tales is currently discussing Death and stories and legends concerning the death motif. I made this post there, and I'm now I'm pestering the rest of you with it. (and sorry for the cross-posting some of you experience)

------






The German painter Alfred Rethel (1816-1859) was best known for painting images based upon German history of stories from the Old Testament, but from about 1848 he did a series of drawings with Death as a central character. His Death character was not part of a fairytale as such, but it was based on the popular image of Death as found in many legends and stories.


cut for images )
baleanoptera: (Default)
The excellent community [livejournal.com profile] told_tales is currently discussing Death and stories and legends concerning the death motif. I made this post there, and I'm now I'm pestering the rest of you with it. (and sorry for the cross-posting some of you experience)

------






The German painter Alfred Rethel (1816-1859) was best known for painting images based upon German history of stories from the Old Testament, but from about 1848 he did a series of drawings with Death as a central character. His Death character was not part of a fairytale as such, but it was based on the popular image of Death as found in many legends and stories.


cut for images )
baleanoptera: (fairytale snowwhite)
....or The Brothers Grimm and the Politics of Sleeping Beauty


The prince sees the castle in the distance


Sometimes a story is just a story, and other times it is perceived as something else entirely. This is one of the latter times....

Once upon a time, in 1807 to be precise, the Brothers Grimm set out to collect.. )
baleanoptera: (fairytale snowwhite)
....or The Brothers Grimm and the Politics of Sleeping Beauty


The prince sees the castle in the distance


Sometimes a story is just a story, and other times it is perceived as something else entirely. This is one of the latter times....

Once upon a time, in 1807 to be precise, the Brothers Grimm set out to collect.. )

Trolls

Feb. 20th, 2007 10:26 pm
baleanoptera: (fairytale Bauer troll hag)
Troll kalla mik
tungl sjötrungnis,
auðsug jötuns,
élsólar böl,
vilsinn völu,
vörð náfjarðar,
hvélsvelg himins –
hvat's troll nema þat?



They call me Troll;
Gnawer of the Moon,
Giant of the Gale-blasts,
Curse of the rain-hall,
Companion of the Sibyl,
Nightroaming hag,
Swallower of the loaf of heaven.
What is a Troll but that?

- from Skáldskaparmál



I've once mentioned that I'm not too fond of trolls. This is true to a point, but to be precise, what I'm not fond of is the stupid, blundering troll. The sinister, creepy troll on the other hand? They are a whole other category. So I thought – why not make a tribute to the trolls I do like? Well, here is my attempt at an audio-visual tribute to trolls.


The water troll Noekken by Theodor Kittelsen


here there be trolls )

Trolls

Feb. 20th, 2007 10:26 pm
baleanoptera: (fairytale Bauer troll hag)
Troll kalla mik
tungl sjötrungnis,
auðsug jötuns,
élsólar böl,
vilsinn völu,
vörð náfjarðar,
hvélsvelg himins –
hvat's troll nema þat?



They call me Troll;
Gnawer of the Moon,
Giant of the Gale-blasts,
Curse of the rain-hall,
Companion of the Sibyl,
Nightroaming hag,
Swallower of the loaf of heaven.
What is a Troll but that?

- from Skáldskaparmál



I've once mentioned that I'm not too fond of trolls. This is true to a point, but to be precise, what I'm not fond of is the stupid, blundering troll. The sinister, creepy troll on the other hand? They are a whole other category. So I thought – why not make a tribute to the trolls I do like? Well, here is my attempt at an audio-visual tribute to trolls.


The water troll Noekken by Theodor Kittelsen


here there be trolls )
baleanoptera: (atumn light trhough branches)
At the risk of repeating myself, I love fairytale illustrations. So here are some more – this time with an art nouveau and jugend style.

So if you wish- step right up, for this time there will be trolls. Mossy, green and strange trolls that seem to blend in and be a part of the forest around them. There will be luminescent princesses and lost boys wandering the woods. And there will be forests, lots and lots of forests.

a cut for hiding the pictures )

These paintings are made by John Bauer (1888-1918). He was a Swedish illustrator and painter. He painted trolls and fairytale motives until the outbreak of World War I, but the horrors reported from the war made him feel that trolls were too trivial, and so he stopped. It gets sadder – he drowned in 1918, along with his wife and their little son.
and some more pictures )
baleanoptera: (atumn light trhough branches)
At the risk of repeating myself, I love fairytale illustrations. So here are some more – this time with an art nouveau and jugend style.

So if you wish- step right up, for this time there will be trolls. Mossy, green and strange trolls that seem to blend in and be a part of the forest around them. There will be luminescent princesses and lost boys wandering the woods. And there will be forests, lots and lots of forests.

a cut for hiding the pictures )

These paintings are made by John Bauer (1888-1918). He was a Swedish illustrator and painter. He painted trolls and fairytale motives until the outbreak of World War I, but the horrors reported from the war made him feel that trolls were too trivial, and so he stopped. It gets sadder – he drowned in 1918, along with his wife and their little son.
and some more pictures )
baleanoptera: (Cassiopeia)
This will be a post about Norwegian fairytales. There will be pictures, but there will be little to no trolls. I’m not that fond of trolls. I am on the other hand fond of fairytale illustrations – and how they deal with the problem of painting the supernatural, that which they have never seen and can only have imagined.

The fairytale illustrations, or sci-fi/fantasy for that matter, seem to work best when they capture a mood, a sense of presence, rather than elaborating details and striving for a realistic look. Maybe because they then allow the viewer to partake in the imagining – to be part of the storytelling process? If a picture is too elaborate, too detailed nothing is left to the imagination. And fairytales, legends, myths - and sci-fi/fantasy – depends greatly on the viewers’ imagination. More so I would say than fiction based in the real world – where references can be anchored in more tangible things than “imagine a hag in a dark, dark wood”.

These pictures generate mood by using nature, and more precisely nearly empty landscapes. When I watch them I feel like a lonely traveller, getting a glimpse of that which is normally hidden. I love these pictures, in the way you love things you have grown up with – a sort of irrational, nostalgic love. Ergo I’d like to share them. This post is also to the sweet [livejournal.com profile] alexandral who expressed a wish to see the pictures.

The paintings are all made by Theodor Kittelsen (1851-1914), a Norwegian painter. He spent his whole life illustrating fairytales and legends. His possibly best work was a series of paintings depicting the Black Death. There’s a small post on them here.

cut for pictures, as this will be very image heavy )
baleanoptera: (Cassiopeia)
This will be a post about Norwegian fairytales. There will be pictures, but there will be little to no trolls. I’m not that fond of trolls. I am on the other hand fond of fairytale illustrations – and how they deal with the problem of painting the supernatural, that which they have never seen and can only have imagined.

The fairytale illustrations, or sci-fi/fantasy for that matter, seem to work best when they capture a mood, a sense of presence, rather than elaborating details and striving for a realistic look. Maybe because they then allow the viewer to partake in the imagining – to be part of the storytelling process? If a picture is too elaborate, too detailed nothing is left to the imagination. And fairytales, legends, myths - and sci-fi/fantasy – depends greatly on the viewers’ imagination. More so I would say than fiction based in the real world – where references can be anchored in more tangible things than “imagine a hag in a dark, dark wood”.

These pictures generate mood by using nature, and more precisely nearly empty landscapes. When I watch them I feel like a lonely traveller, getting a glimpse of that which is normally hidden. I love these pictures, in the way you love things you have grown up with – a sort of irrational, nostalgic love. Ergo I’d like to share them. This post is also to the sweet [livejournal.com profile] alexandral who expressed a wish to see the pictures.

The paintings are all made by Theodor Kittelsen (1851-1914), a Norwegian painter. He spent his whole life illustrating fairytales and legends. His possibly best work was a series of paintings depicting the Black Death. There’s a small post on them here.

cut for pictures, as this will be very image heavy )

Profile

baleanoptera: (Default)
baleanoptera

November 2015

S M T W T F S
1 234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Oct. 17th, 2017 11:26 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios